As the EU has elected 2013 to be the Year of Air a study reveals that Finland ranks among the countries with the best indoor air quality.

WE spend 90 per cent of our time indoors and that is where we breathe the most polluted elements that may threaten our health. According to the recent IAQ (Indoor Air Quality) study, financed by the European Union, 3 per cent of all diseases in Europe are related to indoor pollution.

Local business owner wants to see a plan regarding Finland’s ‘brain economy’.

A local company who guides universities and research projects wants to see what the plan is for one of Finland’s major markets: the students who come and go.

“If we want to keep studies free for students, we have to be much more active trying to connect these students with local businesses, otherwise it’s just madness.” said Mikko Markkanen, owner of Business Arena Oy.

Vilnius, the hear t of Europe.

I am here to invite you to my wonderful city Vilnius. It is wonderful, not because it is mine, but because most of the people who visited and knew how to approach this mysterious place have told me so.

Vilnius reveals most of its beauty if visited from early May to mid October; nevertheless, Christmas time is also extremely bright in the capital of Lithuania. It is particularly great place to go if you love history and its fascinating stories: on each corner of the city you will find something amazing and unique. For this reason Vilnius old town is included in UNESCO world heritage list.

Many may already be contemplating their spring (or even summer?) time plans, but let’s face it, it’s still winter and it can still get mind numbingly cold out there. Here are some tips to keep those precious toes and fingers of yours intact:

Avoid covering your mouth and nose with any type of clothing. The water vapour released while breathing dampens the cloth, consequently freezing it – on your face. If you still feel like covering your face with something, consider – carefully – a bank robber-style face sock that has separate holes for your ‘facial openings’.

We have all seen some news about problems caused by quick loans in this country, but if you happen to have a steady income it is likely that you have never actually taken one. Firstly, what is a quick loan?

Also known as a payday loan (or pikavippi in Finnish) it is a smaller sum of money –usually between 50 and 3,000 euros – put on your account almost instantly by one of the over 80 quick credit companies in Finland. So, how does a quick loan differ from a regular loan?